The most colorful communion bread that you’ll ever make yourself

Guest post by Elizabeth Jancewicz

You might remember Tribe member Elizabeth Jancewicz from her craftsy invitations that she made using a sewing machine. Her creativity apparently does not stop there. Here she shows us how she made the most colorful communion bread we ever did see.

rainbow communion bread 10

A friend who got married two years ago told us that serving communion during their wedding was one of the most meaningful things of their entire ceremony. In thinking about it, I really love the idea of being able to interact on such a deep personal and very spiritual way with our guests during the ceremony, instead of waiting until the greeting line at the end. Plus, over my spiritual life, communion in itself has grown more and more into a strong meaningful event between myself and my relationship with God, and I’m really excited to include this aspect into such an important day for us.

But of course, we couldn’t exactly just have plain ol’ bread!

A little while ago I saw the most awesome rainbow cake on the Tribe. However, I gave up sweets for lent, so instead one evening I made blue, red, and yellow bread with my parents’ three-year-old foster boy, Jaiden. When that came out fairly successfully, I figured I just had to make RAINBOW BREAD!

What follows are some photos my awesome future husband took of the process:

rainbow communion bread 1

It’s just a basic white bread recipe (we have a bread machine, which makes it so super easy). I divided the dough up into six pieces and kneaded in food colouring. The super cool part of this was as I did it, I taught 3-year-old Jaiden how to mix colours! Now he knows that red and blue make purple, red and yellow make orange, and blue and yellow make green. Him knowing this by heart makes him smarter than almost all of my 160 art students, who range from the ages of eight up through twenty!

rainbow communion bread 2

After I kneaded the colour into each piece, I rolled out two of the pieces (purple and blue) separately, wet the top of the purple one with water, then laid the blue piece on top and rolled it again, “gluing” the two flat colours together. Then I’d roll out the next piece (green), wet the top of the blue, place green on top, roll them again, etc. You get the idea.

Then I rolled the whole thing up into a solid colourful loaf. (Wetting the top layer, which as you can see was red, so the whole thing would be tight.)

rainbow communion bread 3

I think the flour caked around my engagement ring is hilarious, and makes me even more glad I don’t have a big bulky rock.

Check out these awesome layers!
Check out these awesome layers!

rainbow communion bread 5
And there’s Jaiden! He’s a Naskapi Native American (Canadian) and most likely the cutest child ever.

Ready to go in the oven.
Ready to go in the oven.
It's so colourful! This is after I let it rise for half an hour.
It’s so colourful! This is after I let it rise for half an hour.
Fully baked!
Fully baked!
And sliced!
And sliced!

Is this not the coolest bread you have EVER seen?! I just love the idea of ripping off a piece of this to hand to our guests to dip in the wine during communion. Oh, and of course, in case I didn’t make this clear, this was just a trial. I’ll make a nice fresh loaf for the wedding, haha. Almost two months!

Comments on The most colorful communion bread that you’ll ever make yourself

  1. Oh my lord!!! that is definitely the coolest bread i have every seen. And now i must make my own! can you imagine eating a sandwich with that?…..

  2. Just a bit of advice from your friendly not-so-local pastry chef. When you’re making bread, or really anything like that that sticks to the table and requires flour to be on your work surface, use a pastry brush or old (clean) paintbrush to brush off all of the extra flour. Less flour means your bread is less likely to come out dry. Also, try brushing the top with egg wash or, even better, melted butter! It will give the purple layer a really pretty shine. Bread looks awesome! This is such a great idea!

  3. Oh man that looks amazing. I wonder if you could roll it different ways and spell out something (a multi-loaf experiment?)?

  4. I sort of have a thing about bread that appears to be blue or green… but when I saw the first photo I was like POTATO BREAD WITH PURPLE POTATOES? Suddenly inspired.

  5. I’m fascinated by the idea of using communion as a ritual to bring the community together around your wedding, and I think your bread is gorgeous.

    Is it going to be a formal communion service, with a priest or clergy person performing the ritual? Can I ask you how you intend to handle non-Christian guests? I’m Jewish, and I’ve witnessed communion services with interest and respect, but I’d never take communion myself.

    • It will be “formal”, but not “orthodox”. We’re hoping that the whole thing will be very casual, and probably announce that anyone who would like to can come up and join with us. I myself have sat out of communion events simply because I didn’t feel comfortable going up. We’re viewing it as sharing a meal, a part of ourselves, and our own spirituality with those we love; but not forcing anything on anyone.

      • We’re doing a communion as well, for entirely this purpose – of uniting and including people in a beautiful ritual! I plan on getting my ‘women’ together to kneed the bread in a little prayer ceremony/meditation ritual. Our phrasing will be something like ‘you are invited to join in communion or in private reflection’ as we have friends and family who aren’t going to join in and that is completely fine.

  6. This idea for bread is just fabulous. I have an almost-three-year-old myself who loves to help me bake. He would love this!

  7. I also have a question related to Rymenhild’s – if it’s going to be a formal, clergy-celebrated ritual, have you consulted your person about whether your recipe works for them? I know that many Catholic priests, for example, would not use your bread as it has been leavened. I expect that in other rites it varies by celebrant also, since technically the Catholic Church doesn’t recognize the gluten-free wafers my Celiac father takes as truly holy…Anyway, that was my first concern after “Oooooh pretty bread!” I’m totally going to try making some, too!

  8. Wow. I desperately want to TRY to make this, just to see if I can! You make it look so fancy and easy.

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