In the New York Times: Grandmas as flower girls

Updated Oct 12 2015
arielmstallings
Photos by Genevieve Leiper, courtesy of thefullbouquetblog.com.
Photos from Lana & Michael's wedding by Genevieve Leiper, courtesy of thefullbouquetblog.com.

Remember about a year ago when I wrote about weddings with grandmas as flowergirls? Well, the New York Times interviewed me for a story about the trend:

Photo by Genevieve Leiper
Photo by Genevieve Leiper
Ariel Meadow Stallings, the founder of Offbeat Bride, a wedding blog that features nontraditional weddings, said that brides selecting grandmothers as attendants is part of a larger trend: couples wanting to include their family members in the wedding, but not in a traditional way.

"For a lot of couples and their families, there's friction between the traditional role that families play in weddings and the couple's concerns about where those traditions come from and the feeling that they don't reflect their lives," Ms. Stallings said.

Rather than eliminating those roles completely, which can cause family turmoil, she is seeing more couples incorporating family members in ways that highlight those individuals' character traits or abilities.

Ms. Stallings suggests asking, "How can we celebrate who this person is?"

The New York Times article includes the most adorable video:

Read the full NYTimes article here, and if you want to see the wedding that first introduced us to the idea of grandmas being flowergirls, be sure to check out Lana & Michael's wedding on The Full Bouquet.

  1. Makes me wish more than ever than my darling grandmother was still with us. I would have had her be my flower girl in a heartbeat. Hell, I would have had her escort me down the aisle along with my parents.

  2. We didn't have any attendants, but I did involve my grandma in a meaningful way. We signed our marriage license in the middle of the ceremony, and she came up and signed as a witness, then I gave her my bouquet to hold during the ceremony. It was very sweet, and I was so glad to find a way to honor her in the ceremony.

    • We did this! Our maternal grandmothers were our witnesses. It's great that they signed our marriage certificate :-).

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