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Clay vs. stone: how we planned a multicultural wedding in the Western world

Wedding planning is like carving a statue: you chisel away at the granite to end up with the statue of your dreams. The rock you start with is based on what a wedding has looked like to you and your partner or what the world around you is offering such as bridesmaids, aisles, bouquets, vows, officiant, a white dress, etc. Chisel away the things you don't want, and keep the things you do. This felt wrong for us, though. We needed to be potters, building something up from clay.

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4 ways to avoid interfaith wedding drama

The internet abounds with horror stories about the drama that can surround interfaith weddings. Families insisting on this or that, wedding officiants refusing to work with you… but the truth is that you can have the wedding of your dreams — a beautiful melding of your cultures — with minimal drama. Here's how…

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When Hinduism and Taiwanese wedding traditions combine: a multicultural wedding day

Helen and Deepak hail from Chicago but traveled down to Port Orange, Florida, to get married at The Estate on the Halifax. The multicultural pair intertwined Hindu wedding traditions with Taiwanese influences and owned it — the day included a lot of awesome details, like the fan-turned-wedding program and mismatched red bridesmaids dresses. Twinkle lights lined each corner of the reception hall, and the party moved indoors to enjoy a fruit-heavy dessert table (no cake!) and tons of dancing.

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Combine traditions and interests with a Henna & Halo party

The night before our interfaith wedding, we had a big party. My partner Shreyas' mom wanted to have a henna party, where all the women get mehendi, but she wanted to have the guys come, too. Shreyas objected, saying mehendi was a "girl thing" and didn't want to do it. We compromised by having a manly activity too, and thus the Henna & Halo party was born.