Sarah & Eddie's "it takes a village" theater wedding

By on Jan. 12th

Photos by family and friends

The offbeat bride: Sarah, dog groomer/nightclub security

Her offbeat partner: Eddie, motorcycle mechanic

Location & date of wedding: Genesee Theatre, Waukegan, IL — October 10, 2010

Our offbeat wedding at a glance: We planned a brunch wedding, which cut the costs down by about 50%. And brunch is just tasty. I think the best part of our wedding was the role our communtity took in it. We never would have been able to afford a wedding like ours if we didn't have the help of our wonderful friends and family. They did hair and makeup, played live music, DJed, sang, cooked, took photos and video, made invites, paper goods, and centerpieces. People would say that they were doing something, and like magic it was there.

I actually showed up on the day of the wedding and saw a videographer rig being set up and said "huh, I didn't know I had one of those coming." It turns out that one of Eddie's long time friends did that for a living and decided to make that part of his gift to us. (See the video here!)

Oh yeah, and we had a meatloaf wedding cake.

Tell us about the ceremony: We were married on a sunny Sunday afternoon in an awesome art deco theater. The ceremony was officiated by a friend of ours who took on the role of circus-like ring master of ceremonies. We were surrounded by about 200 of our friends and family. I wore a beautiful dress made by Chrissy Wai-ChingThey ♥ OBB; we ♥ them, which thankfully still fit my then-20-weeks-pregnant body at the time of the wedding. Instead of flowers, I carried a vintage purse that belonged to my great-grandmother.

A friend played Tesla's "Love Song" on the guitar for the processional, and the recessional was Billy Idol's "White Wedding." During the ceremony, we had friends sing Yaz's "Only You," and the best man read from The Velveteen Rabbit. We wrote our own vows and promised to always love, laugh, and dance with each other.

Cole invites

Our biggest challenge: Putting together a wedding that was uniquely us, but still considerate of others' wishes was a challenge. We had to pick our battles, and some things are definitely not worth the fight. After all, you still have to deal with all of the people after the wedding is over.

My favorite moment: I loved our ceremony. There was something so amazing about being on a stage in front of all of those people, and feeling like it was just us. However, the time I spent with my father before the ceremony was the most meaningful to me. We didn't know if he was going to be at the wedding, having spent six weeks in a coma the previous summer, and nearly dying from complications of his cancer.

Before the ceremony, we sat up in the balcony watching all of the people walk in, just talking and laughing until it was time to walk down the aisle. During our father/daughter dance, he told me how proud I had made him and I just lost it. I had managed to not cry during the ceremony by some fluke, but I couldn't help it.

Meatloaf cake!

My advice for offbeat brides: Think about what is most important to you and your signifigant other, and if something is not all that important to you, it's okay to make a compromise for the sake of someone else's happiness. Our wedding was not just about us. It was about our family and our friends too. These people had played an important part in our lives up until this point, so making sure that they felt like a part of our wedding was important.

1st dance

Care to share a few vendor/shopping links?

Enough talk — show me the wedding porn!

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They ♥ OBB; we ♥ themThis post features Offbeat Vendors! Check out their vendor listing to see how they cater to Offbeat Brides: