A homemade, pin-up, patchwork flask garter

August 2 | Guest post by Rosemeg

A friend is getting married this week, and she requested some time ago that I make a garter that can hold a flask. I thought about it for a long time. I Googled. All I found for inspiration were satin and lace and had pockets that snapped. Nothing wrong with that, but my personal aesthetic is a bit more homey.

I cut up some fabric and patch worked away. This was my first attempt at improvisational quilting — fun, because it was so tiny that it was not intimidating. I found some pin-up Photoshop brushes and used an iron-on transfer for the center square.

I didn't take pictures as I went, so this is not a proper tutorial, but here are some general tips if you'd like to attempt it yourself…

I was totally winging it. My engaged friend actually has a pretty narrow flask that would probably be better to strap to one's thigh, but I know she (or at least the future husband — I bet he'd share) has a standard sized flask. Imagine my delight when, not having measured or used a pattern, a standard flask fit like a glove!

While I didn't document the patchwork process, I can tell you that the bag size was about 5 1/4 inch square, stitched together with 1/4" seam allowance, and it fits the flask perfectly width-wise. If you make one, it might make sense to make it a bit longer — closer to seven inches — if you want the entire flask to slide into the bag.

I hummed and hawed about how to attach the pocket to the garter. In the end, I simply made an outer pocket, put some buttonholes in the back panel, and threaded the garter through:

And voila! Filled with booze, it might require a proper garter belt to stay put and withstand the weight. Empty, it works just fine.

Shown lower on the thigh than it's meant to be worn — my engaged friend's legs are smaller than mine. I used about 15 inches of elastic, threaded it through a wee patchwork tube of fabric, and overlapped the ends of the elastic by about an inch and zig-zag stitched together. Not sure why my leg looks so goose pimply, but that's neither here nor there.

Now I'm off to drop it off at her office so she has it for her special day and to scheme about making more and more and more! I have my sights set on some more traditionally frilly ones, still with the same homey stripes and muslin look. Wheee!

  1. Lovely – it definitely has a vintage look too. if the weight of a full flask is a problem, I think using wider elastic might help or even two bands of the thin elastic.

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  2. Awesome! I have made one of these before and they are fairly simple. Anything to get you through a stressful situation, right? ;) Thanks for sharing. I love the patchwork.

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  3. Did you make that pin-up patch in the center?

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    • Yes! I used an iron-on transfer to make the center patch. The pin-up image came from a line of free photoshop brushes (endless fun!). Thanks for the love, you guys!

      p.s. The bride went with a small round flask, and I don't believe the weight was a problem at all.

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  4. oh i am SO doing this! my venue doesn't allow spirits…except for the 999 happy haunts that already reside there.

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