Amanda & Jeff's budget, kilted, country wedding

By on Mar. 25th

The last day of Kilt Week is a wedding with a freakin' Batmobile!! What more do I even need to say? – Becca

The offbeat bride: Amanda, director of a non-profit arts organization (and Tribe member)

Her offbeat partner: Jeff, magician (!)

Location & date of wedding: Peach Brandy Cottage, Dawsonville, Georgia, — October 3, 2010

What made our wedding offbeat: We did everything our way, down to every last "I went to Jeff and Amanda's wedding and all I got was this lousy button" party favor. We had friends play acoustic '80s music before our ceremony. We were dared to incorporate "Brick House," and we made $100 bucks by doing it. We borrowed a replica 1960s batmobile for our getaway car.

From the first moment we got engaged, we knew we wanted a venue that could house ALL our peeps, provide simple southern fare, allow us to bring in liquor, oh, and a beautiful atmosphere that wouldn't break the bank. Not too tall an order, right? We found a cozy little farm in the country and I knew it was meant to be when I read the words "party barn" on their website.

My friends were the best support system. In lieu of a wedding party, we asked our friend Olaf to officiate (he was ordained online many years ago and was honored to provide this service to us.) His wife, Fox, my closest friend, is a professional photographer (and pregnant). My mother-in-law did the flowers — sunflowers, my favorite — and they were everywhere. My dear friend from high school is a professional pastry chef, and she SHIPPED the cakes in from Florida the day before and followed by plane (also pregnant).

The Han Solo in Carbonite groom's cake was chocolate with peanut butter buttercream frosting.

We danced our well-choreographed "number" to "When I'm Sixty-four" and box stepped, foxtrotted and tangoed around the room to the amazement of our guests.

Tell us about the ceremony: We had our friends play an all '80s acoustic guitar set for our guests. I entered to "Can't Help Falling In Love" and we departed to the "Cantina Band" from Star Wars.

As we had no church affiliation and were not having a wedding party, the person marrying us needed to be special — and he was. Our official officiant story was detailed very well on my blog by my dear friend Olaf.

Our biggest challenge: With very vocal and involved people on both sides, it was hard, at first, to distinguish constructive criticism from criticism. Those last two weeks before the wedding I had moments when I didn't even recognize myself. Don't be afraid to delegate, but if it is something VERY important, only delegate to someone you trust inherently, or just relax and allow it all to happen as it will. We had a lot of good laughs and, in the end, everything that truly mattered went off without a hitch.

My favorite moment: Seeing my husband for the first time was my favorite moment. We decided to have all of our photographs taken before the guests arrived, and those private moments before anyone got there are very precious to me.

Other magical and unexpected moments included when my dad, a large manly man, started crying while we danced to "Landslide," and when my grandmother welled up and clutched my hand.

My funniest moment: My mother would say that the Batmobile stole the party. When our "ride" arrived at the farm, there was some buzz and the entire reception clamored to see it. We managed to get people back inside for another hour or so for some frolicking and dancing before the actual departure.

Was there anything you were sure was going to be a total disaster that unexpectedly turned out great? I was surprised how well the divorced families were able to come together and enjoy the weekend. I don't know why I expelled the energy to worry needlessly about it in the first place. We had a small rehearsal dinner at a local Mexican restaurant and there was much general merriment to be had for the duration of our event.

My advice for offbeat brides: Talk about what will make the day important to you and your husband. Have a unified game plan for how to deal with the "nay sayers" that mean well as you try to actualize your vision. The truth of the matter is that your day will be over in a flash and what you want to remember is having a blast, and not that the flowers froze or the swans were sick.

What was the most important lesson you learned from your wedding? A wedding is a party — albeit a really good party with everyone present that is dear to you (and some great outfits) — but at the end of the day it is just another day for a great party. Look forward to the marriage and enjoy the wedding for the special day that it is.

Care to share a few vendor/shopping links?

  • Invitations: Seal-n-send invites were a godsend at Ann's Bridal Bargains. Sealing wax that goes in a glue gun from Nostalgic Impressions is a modern marvel.
  • Outfits: We both purchased our head-to-toe ensembles online and spent less than a thousand dollars IN TOTAL.
  • Kilt tuxedo: An entire kilt tuxedo (hose, shoes and all the do-dads) was found on ebay. Jeff opted to purchase an additional kilt in Hamilton gray to complete his "look."
  • Dress: I found my dress in a boutique, but hated the "boutique" experience, so I wrote down the information and found it at Best Dress Price for a fraction of the cost. I am not ashamed to say it was $189, directly from China, and their customer service was great.
  • Shoes: The fabulous shoes from Zappos.com got more accolades than the dress.
  • Fascinator/veil combo: Etsy.com.
  • Photographer: Celestial Photography
  • Cake: Sugar Chef

Enough talk — show me the wedding porn!

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